Google Searches

Central Australia!

Hello! G’Day! Howzitgarn? Please accept my many apologies for such a long absence between blog entries! I am sitting at a cafe called Red Dog cafe in the Todd Street Mall in Alice Springs. The weather has been really weird the past few days with drizzle, a few thunderstorms and rain! But let’s start back to when we were in Darwin!

We arrived in Darwin on the 10th October. My graduation ceremony for my Bachelor of Nursing was held on 12th October at the Darwin Convention Centre. I have to say, Charles Darwin University really made it a very special event for everyone and I felt so proud to be amongst a group of students who had made so many sacrifices and worked so hard to be there in their gowns and mortarboards.

I wore my beads made by a lady in the remote Aboriginal community of Canteen Creek. It was a reminder and a symbol of where I had come from, where I want to be and the people I want to serve and care for as a nurse.

The two parts I felt teary were when the doctors were given their degrees and called ‘Dr’ for the first time and when the people were receiving their Certificates; the tradesmen who had taken time off work, still dressed in their work boots, shorts and hi-vis shirts wrapped in a black gown and looking so proud of themselves. The people who had worked hard to learn English as their second, or third, or fourth language. The one and only recipient, a female, who had gained her certificate in metal fabricating!

Everyone receiving their qualifications on that day were from different socio-economic backgrounds, different families, different abilities but everyone had achieved what they set out to achieve regardless of whether it was a Certificate 1 or a doctorate. We were all in the same big room shaking the hand of the university Chancellor and feeling really damn proud of ourselves and each other.

My Mum came all the way up to Darwin from Albany and along with Tim, my brother Simon (who lives in Darwin) rearranged his work to be there to see me accept my degree; even though that meant he had to work longer to make up the time. I was so thrilled and proud to have them there with me on that day and very thankful they were able to come. I looked up at them after I accepted my degree and saw all three looking down at me with pride; an amazing feeling.

It was a long arduous journey to get my Bachelor of Nursing degree. There were many sleepless nights full of anxiety and self-deprecation. Mornings of clinical placements where I was in tears and wishing I had never started studying! But I had immense support from family and friends and I am now at the beginning of my next journey.

Last year, when I was up in Darwin for my clinical training block, I stayed with my brother and his family and made a promise to my sister-in-law that once Tim and I got to Darwin for my graduation ceremony (what seemed like a looooong way away!) we would sip champagne and laugh about how stressed out I was! So Katie, Tim, Mum and I floated around in their swimming pool, sipping champagne and I couldn’t believe I was finished!!

I wish I could say the rest of our stay in Darwin was as fabulous, however over the course of a few days I developed a tickling cough and on the Sunday, put myself to bed just after lunch where the cough quickly escalated into a raging fever, headaches and general malaise. I was as sick as a dog for days and couldn’t leave the granny flat bedroom where we were staying. Tim caught it off me and a few days later developed the same miserable symptoms. We both were in quarantine for just under a week until we felt slightly better to emerge and plan our trip down to Alice Springs! It was the worst flu-type illness I remember having and we were both feeling extremely worse for wear!

I bought a car in Darwin so on Friday 19th October, Tim and I planned to drive to Mataranka then Tennant Creek then Alice Springs. And that we did. Dosing up on Sudafed and cough mixture, we made the long journey to these destinations, stayed one night to rest then back on the road. We didn’t visit any attractions, focussing our energy on keeping alert while driving to each stop-over!

We arrived in Alice Springs on the Sunday and checked into the best caravan park in the town. ‘G’Day Mate’ Caravan Park is lovely and we had a grassy area with an en-suite bathroom – luxury! The swimming pool was large and clean so we floated around in it to escape the heat. Before long we were joined by a few people who live at the caravan park, 2 of them nurses! One was even a mental health nurse! So we had a lot to chat about and in true territorian fashion, they were quick to invite Tim and I on their social occasions and welcomed us to Central Australia. We are keeping in touch with them and hope to attend lawn bowls this Thursday!

thumbnail_IMG_2796

Unfortunately the heat was too much to bear living out of a camper trailer so Tim and I bit the bullet and checked into a furnished apartment until we can move into our little rental house early November.

I have full time work which I start this Thursday until my graduate program starts in late March. Tim is taking it easy and looking at his options for the time being!

I met a fellow graduate student last week and we chatted for hours which was lovely. Other than that, we’ve been getting paperwork ready, viewed potential rentals, a little bit of sight-seeing and generally settling into a new city!

I’m looking forward to making new friends here in Alice and really miss my friends back home. I guess we can sometimes take having friends around for granted and I’m really feeling it being away from everyone. But this is what happens with change and I know both Tim and I will make wonderful new friends here!

So that’s about it for where Tim and I are at! We survived travelling around WA and have made it safely to our destination of Alice Springs!

thumbnail_IMG_2673

Stay tuned and I’ll update as much as I can.

Lots of love to everyone xoxoxo

 

Google Searches

Our Story

Reading some other stories about how travelling came to be, it occurred to me that there are lots of you out there in this spectacular world who have no idea who I am nor how I came to be a nurse and travelling Australia.

So this is our story.

Tim and I met way back in 2010 and I moved in with him in 2011. Initially we decided we would like to buy a few acres and a house somewhere on the outskirts of our hometown Albany in Western Australia.

IMG_1494

I was working as a personal care assistant in aged care and Tim was (and is) a boilermaker working for a locally owned company. In 2011, I was offered a scholarship by my then manager to become an Enrolled Nurse. Working towards this goal, I also worked full-time while studying part time. As is required for many areas of study, I was required to attend clinical placements at hospitals so I used all my annual leave attending these full-time placements.

Tim and I loved to go away on weekends (or whenever I had a few days off, working shift work and all) and one particular weekend in 2012, we camped at Bluff Creek, a beach further up the coastline from Cheynes Beach WA. Sitting under the black sky scattered with bright stars and a warm campfire burning next to us, I realised I didn’t want to spend the rest of my life in Albany paying off a mortgage having never travelled. I told Tim that I wanted to travel when I finished studying (both my Enrolled Nursing Diploma then Bachelor degree in Nursing). Tim said he would do it with me, so that night, we decided that when I had finished my degree and Tim was due his 10 year long service leave, we would pack up and become nomads. That year, so far in the future, was 2018.

For the next 6 years, I finished studying my Enrolled Nursing Diploma then my Bachelor of Nursing all the while working full time. I spent every hour of my accrued annual leave to attend clinical placements which left me feeling really exhausted and pretty burnt out.  However I left aged care and began working in Mental Health, an area I have and always will be passionate about. I was extremely lucky to have a brilliant manager who encouraged and supported staff studying so I was able to attend clinical placements when offered and even travelled to the Northern Territory for a full 2 months of clinical placements in various Aboriginal communities. I had the best time of my life in those 2 months and it ignited a deep and profound respect and passion for providing health care to Indigenous communities. I had wanted to be a Remote Area Nurse for a long time and this placement cemented my goal to become one and work all around Australia.

We set a date of 17th August 2018 when we would be driving out of our driveway and on the next part of our lives. This date was quickly creeping up and we had heaps to do.

We listed all our furniture on Facebook Buy & Sell groups and were surprised at how easily and quickly we were able to sell everything. The house became more and more empty until the final night was spent on a mattress on the floor.

We had saved money and added the dosh from selling our belongings to our travel kitty. I had paid off my debts over the years and Tim had chosen a real estate to lease his house through.

I didn’t have much furniture, having given away or sold a lot of it when I moved in with Tim. However it was harder for Tim emotionally as he was selling everything he had worked hard to buy especially his beloved motorbike, couch and TV.

We had a cat Leila and dog Izzy as well. Leila has gone to live with Tim’s dad and reports back are saying Leila is loving being a lap warmer and spends her days snoozing on ‘Grandad’s’ lap or under his bed covers! Izzy is staying with Tim’s sister until we settle in Alice Springs. Tim’s sister has 4 kids, the two younger ones being at home more and are loving playing with Izzy. We feel so comforted and grateful that our pets are being cared for so well and in homes full of love and attention. Of course we could have taken Izzy with us however we really wanted to see a lot of National Parks and decided it would be kinder for Izzy to remain in Albany rather than having to spend time in random kennels while we are on the road.

So that was how we came to travel, in a nutshell. Of course there were a lot of emotions going on. I had been living back in Albany for 12 years and Tim had lived there all his life (apart from stints living away) so we were leaving friends, family and pets behind, not to forget stable jobs! However now we are on the road, we keep in touch regularly via social networking, phone calls, texts and postcards!

I’m sure many people who travel, both overseas and around Australia are often told how ‘lucky’ they are. But luck has nothing to do with it. Travelling and having the funds to travel requires a lot of work, sacrifices and dedication. For seven years while I studied both my EN and RN I never had a holiday, not to Bali, not over east, not one holiday. Tim and I took little breaks for a day or two but otherwise I was either working and studying full time and/or attending clinical placement in hospitals (full time shifts).

We both had our sights set on becoming free from the daily grind and worked hard to achieve it. Once I finish my grad year in Alice Springs, we will be back on the road picking up nursing/welding work to fund our travels.

I am sitting at my laptop at a place called Cygnet Bay on the Dampier Peninsula. It is a balmy evening and I’m sipping on icy cold apple cider, looking forward to what tomorrow brings. In a couple of days we will be doing the Gibb River Road then heading to Darwin for my graduation ceremony on the 12th October.

So if you want to travel, anywhere in the world or around your own country, you CAN do it! It doesn’t need to be expensive and you can do it on a budget. Just work hard and save as much as you can, you can always pick up work on the road if you need.

There are heaps of Facebook pages that are really informative and helpful. I have found quite a few really helpful, here are some links:

MY RIG Adventures

Not Grey Nomads

Trekking Downunder

Seeking the Serenity

Thanks for reading! – Rachel xoxox

Uncategorized

Dilly the Dolphin

It’s a bit of a cloudy day here on Double Beach, a secluded paradise on the southern peninsula of Shark Bay, on a station called Tamala. On the North peninsula, almost at the end, is a town called Denham which reminds me of a mix between the coastal towns in the TV shows Sea Change and Home & Away; sunny, friendly and beachy.

The last time I wrote, we were staying at 40-mile beach around 50km south of Karratha. It was a pleasant campsite with warm sunny weather and plenty of space. However, the tide went out in the early morning and didn’t come back until later in the evening so swimming wasn’t really possible. Tim and I spent the first day exploring via 4WD along the sand dunes and reefs. We loved looking at the rock pools where brightly coloured crabs would hear our impending company and scuttle away. Slow or sleepy crabs weren’t so quick and made a mad dash around the edges of the rock pools when we approached; one crab even leapt through a hole landing right at my feet causing me to squeal!

Due to the magic of geocaching, we found a beautiful billabong called Miaree Pool only 20km north of our campsite. It was obviously a favourite place for motorhomes to pull up but there was plenty of space. The water was deep and dark green, a rope swing hung still from the branch of a grandfatherly white gum while ibis, black swans and the odd willy wagtail would swim and scoop up fish. We swam for about an hour, floating in the coolness and appreciating the landscape sharing this refreshing part of itself with us.

We stayed three nights at 40-mile beach then made the 4.5 hour drive to Carnarvon where stayed at one of six caravan parks. We did the usual load of washing, showering and I made use of the swimming pool. We visited the Carnarvon Space Museum which was fantastic and very interactive. The best bit for me was getting pat Buzz, the resident cat who managed to sleep on the front counter while hordes of people came bustling through!

We were itching to get going to Shark Bay and hopefully find a piece of beach where we could swim and relax. Thanks to WikiCamps, we chose a place called Double Beach on Tamala Station. We rang before we arrived at Shark Bay and were directed to go to a cottage on the station where we would pay for our stay ($17 per person per night plus $50 key deposit for the gates) and they also gave us a small load of fire wood.

Yesterday (9th September 2018) I had breakfast then read/snoozled until around 11am. We then swam, kayaked, fished, walked, read and swam again when the tide had come in. When the tide is out, the water is about thigh deep for about 500m but when the tide is in, it is about neck deep so you can have a good swim without touching the ground.

Today (10th September 2018) We watched a dolphin slowly swim by, up and down, up and down. We were hoping to see him while we were kayaking but he dilly-dallied away before we got out there. Sting-rays, some sandy coloured and some darker, skimmed the ocean floor creating circles of sandy dust when they would flit away. We are careful where we tread and make waves to warn them of our impending soft-footed steps.

The sandflies here are horrible and despite covering ourselves with loads of Bushmans Plus, they still manage to find somewhere to torment us especially when we’re sitting on the loo!

The night sky here is a matte black velvet blanket, draped over the highest points of the earth with different size pinpricks letting in the light of Heaven. It is encompassing and commanding, your eyes take longer to adjust to the thick blackness and every rock looks like a creature waiting in the dark. The walls of stony sand-dunes amplify the ocean and bird noises creating an ampitheatre of nocturnal audio theatre.

Earlier, as I was writing this, a mahogany fox ran out of the scrub about 5 metres away from me. His tongue hung out the side of his mouth and he trotted away, with a cheeky look on his face as if to say ‘I’ll be back for morsels or your shoes!’.

I have just returned from ‘the hill’ where I can get phone signal. Sitting quietly uploading photos from my phone, I looked up to see a baby King Brown snake peering at me less than a metre from my feet. It slithered quickly away while I leapt up and wobbled away over the rocks as fast as I could. I looked back to see I had left my towel where I was sitting. Tim called up to me and made the trek up to retrieve my towel while I stood perched on a rock in my sturdy granny sandals, fly bitten legs and clutching my laptop bag, pointing to the last place Mr Brown was seen. I followed Tim with trepidation back to where I was sitting until Tim points down and says ‘Oh, there he is’, the snake lying about 20cm from my foot, Tim had walked right past him. That was it, I clambered away and sang my Mum’s ‘Go away snakes!’ song (complicated lyrics: “Go away snakes! Go away snakes! <repeat>) to warn any other slitherers that granny sandals was on her way!

11th September 2018: We are now back in Carnarvon topping up fuel and supplies then heading to Gnaraloo Station as suggested by one of my brothers. Bring on more swimming, fishing and relaxing! Oh it’s a hard life!

IMG_1625

Take Care!!!!

Books I’ve read since we’ve left:

  • A Man Called Dave by Dave Pelzer
  • The Not So Subtle Art of Being a Fat Girl by Tess Holliday
  • Jasper Jones by Craig Silvey
  • Perfect Match by Jodi Picoult
Google Searches

Get to the sun!

We have left Albany! We left last Friday the 17th August 2018, 45 minutes later than we anticipated. Who cares, all good. The car took ages to fill both tanks with 270L of diesel but while doing so, we met a guy who was about to cross the Nullabor to Victoria.

I spent a gorgeous day with my oldest brother and his family in Busselton. I watched my nieces netball game and had a 9 holes of golf with my brother, nephew and my nephews friends. And I won! woooohooooo! It was also nice sitting up until 1.30am on the Friday night just talking with my brother of whom I don’t get to see that often.

So I am sitting here with the sun beaming down on me as the afternoon progresses into the evening, tapping away on my keyboard in a destination that I thought we would simply pass through rather than spend the night in. What happened?

We got to Bunbury Farmer’s Market and the car wouldn’t start. RAC was called who diagnosed that the regulator on the alternator is buggered. So we have checked into a caravan park in Bunbury to get it sorted tomorrow.

After initially feeling really bloody pissed off, especially on our very very very first day of our adventure, we’ve both calmed down and just relaxing. It WILL get fixed and we WILL be on our way to get to the sun!

I’m having a glass of wine while I type and Tim’s having a beer while he watches me type. Forge ahead we say! Next update will be north of Perth!

Keep posted!

Google Searches

No Fixed Address

‘So where shall I send the final bill?’ she asked. Cancelling all our subscriptions and services, we had heard this question multiple times. ‘No fixed address’ I reply ‘Email it please’.

In 66 hours, Tim and I will be itinerant with NFA. Woohoo!

Our house is getting sparse. I have one basket of clothes and three pairs of shoes. Our dog and cat are going to family while we travel to Alice Springs. Izzy the dog will be flying to Alice Springs when we settle there but Leila the cat will stay with ‘Grandad’ (Tim’s Dad).

Alice Springs. I got a nursing graduate program in Alice Springs hospital! It was my first choice so I am absolutely THRILLED to start there early next year! I have nominated to go to ED, ICU or Surgical to build my skills and knowledge so I can go on the next year to do the transition to remote area nursing program. I feel so proud to be a new staff member at Alice Springs Hospital and both Tim and I are looking forward to making new friends in the N.T.

IMG_A41781173777-1

 

The last few weeks I have been catching up with friends as much as possible. Tim has been getting a lot of work done to the Landcruiser and we’ve been selling and giving away furniture and belongings. Neither of us work anymore so it’s given us more time to get things ready. We’ve been cleaning the house, sorting out insurances, buying more camping stuff and finally downloaded Wikicamps Australia.

I’ve been going through a flurry of emotions ranging from excitement to nervousness but overall, I can’t wait to hit the road and get north of Perth to feel the heat. Albany has been wet wet wet so sunshine is the light we will be pursuing! A few of my dear friends bought me a St Christopher (patron saint of travellers) pendant and chain which I have not taken off (except for the photo!) and a colleague got me a pen engraved with The Scribbling Nurse.

And I got matching tattoos with a beautiful friend of mine who actually comes from Alice Springs! We drove home alternating between crying and laughing while reminiscing the years of our friendship.

Tomorrow and Thursday the rest of our furniture is being bought and collected so we will have a mattress on the floor of the lounge for the night.

I’ll be spending two nights in Busselton with one of my brothers and his family while Tim will visit his friend in Capel. On Sunday morning we will leave early and drive as far as we can to get north of Perth and to really start our journey!

So stay tuned because I’ll be updating often with lots of photos of our journey!

 

 

 

 

The Scribbling Nurse

And then there was 8

Eight. 8. acht, huit, otto, nane. Eight weeks until Tim and I will be pulling out of our driveway towing the bonky old camper trailer and our sun-glasses clad bonces focussing on our new future.

camper

But that’s still eight weeks away and we still have a bit to do to get there. Our shower is almost finished and apart from getting the place painted, we don’t really need to do much else (yay!!) We are showering using a gas instant hot water system in a shower tent in the backyard which is actually really nice! Maybe not so much for the neighbours… haha!

It’s been a lovely time since I returned from the NT. I had an amazing opportunity to meet my favourite comedienne Urzila Carlson after seeing her live at the Regal Theatre in Perth. Her humour is ‘out there’ but HILARIOUS and hits the nail right on the head! Have a watch of the clip but beware; lots of curse words!

Urzila and Me

Izzy has a new collar with superhero logos on it. She wanted me to tell you that.
izzys-collar.jpg

I had quite a bit of a response about my last blog post on suicide. I feel so honoured that some of you shared your story and I appreciate the encouragement from others for writing a piece that was very difficult yet something my heart wanted to say.

There is a new website called http://www.study101.com which allows visitors to research education providers and determine which course and provider is best for them. You can review the uni you are using or read reviews others have written. I was asked to write an article about being a nursing student and am thrilled it is now on the site!  MainLogo

I also want to give a quick thank you to the following blogs/websites who have featured my blog and helped reach out to many more people: Charles Darwin University ‘LaunchPad’, Australian College of Nursing ‘NurseClick’, NurseUncut & feedspot.com

Anyway, better get back to doing stuff, whatever that is! Thanks for reading!

Take care

-Rachel

Tags

Please don’t go, I love you so.

It’s crisp here in Denmark, Western Australia, a small town on the south coast. Crisp, fresh, bracing, refreshing… I am a thesaurus! I’m here by myself for a couple of days in a really cool AirBnB on a lake, with iridescent blue wrens with round little bodies skipping around just beyond the glass sliding door; so close yet so far.

How have you been? I think about you, even though I don’t know you. I wonder where you are sitting as you read this blog. Are you happy? Do you know if you are happy? If we don’t have troubles now and then, how would we know when we’re happy?

Anthony_Bourdain_2014_(cropped)

That brings me to Anthony Bourdain. Yesterday, Friday the 8th June 2018, Anthony was found in his hotel room in France after taking his own life. Death by hanging. Anthony was a celebrated chef and food writer, featuring in foodie shows such as No Reservations, The Layover and Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown. He was never afraid to try what us Westerners would call ‘ugh, really weird food that I would never try in a thousand years’ or ‘I can’t believe he is putting that in his mouth!’.

When I hear about suicides, I feel a pulling gnarly feeling in my heart. My eyes start leaking and I have to look away from whatever it is I’m reading or whoever it is I’m talking to. I’m not a stranger to having suicidal thoughts or, dare I share it, an attempt. When I become aware of a suicide, I feel drawn straight back to the empty blackness that filled my being when I truly believed I was better off out of this world and maybe, in my void of rationality, being reincarnated as someone who is immune to the dark feelings.

Who wants to talk about people killing themselves? Not many, but we need to. We need to not focus on the celebrity ‘live fast, die young and leave a good looking corpse’ but how to reach out, connect with someone; hold their hand, hug them, let them hear you pour out all your reasons of why you think you would be better off not here. And we can let people listen to us, nod their heads, cry with us and purge feelings we have kept suppressed for so long. Feelings that have festered and turned toxic. Feelings that have become imbedded in who we think we are and who we think the world thinks we are.

This too shall pass. 

Yes, I work in Mental Health and I am passionate about mental health. But I know people who don’t work in mental health but are just as passionate about supporting people going through a tough time. You don’t have to have a mental illness to go through shit or feel like shit or wish that shit would just get better.

I can’t sit here and write sentiments like ‘Things will get better’ or ‘You are special, the world needs you’ because although those things can be true, what good is it going to do right now? But what I can say, from my own personal experiences, not quoting anyone but myself is that it is sometimes damn hard to forge ahead, especially when you resigned yourself to being 6 foot under in a matter of days. It is damn hard but a problem shared is a problem halved, and when I reached out to a good friend, when I let her know how low I was and how I needed someone to look out for me; she did. And every day I was above ground, I worked hard at achieving small successes. I went to work even though I hated being there because I was saving to find another job; that helped. I made myself see friends, go to coffee dates and contact my family. I tried to laugh and when I tried to laugh I started laughing because my fake laugh sounded so stupid it was funny.

As I think back, 10 years ago when I was at one of the worst times of my life, I bring myself to the present; where I am now, typing this to thousands of people of whom I have never met and may never will. I’m in a good place, through hard work and determination, through times and events that I thought I’d never recover from; I’m in a good place and I’m going to stay here even if things aren’t good all the time.

The sun will come up tomorrow and you’ll be here. I’ll be here and we can be shoulders of strength to people who truly believed the sun wouldn’t come up. And we can show them it has. Because it will.

There is always someone to listen, call Lifeline on 13 11 14 if you or someone you know may need help. 13 11 14.

sunrise

Take care.

Rachel.